California Teachers Union Opposed Sports Betting Legalization

California Teachers Union Opposed Sports Betting Legalization

While some parties are bickering over how to legalize online sports gambling in California, others, such as the California Teachers Association – one of the biggest unions in the Golden State – has cooled passions as it has positioned itself in diametrical opposition to campaigners. In fact, the CTA believes that bringing online sports betting online would not be a good idea at all.

Ballot Measure Won’t Be Getting  “A” from Teachers

The union said it would not support the “Californians for Solutions to Homelessness and Mental Health Support” which should see $100 million contributed to tackling homelessness and various mental health issues. The money is supposed to come from taxes that are collected by levying online gambling apps.

But the union’s 600-member State Council of Education is not really convinced that the measure hits the mark. As a result, the union and its 310,000 members will seek to oppose the proposed measure altogether, believing that spreading online betting in California would not bring any benefits. Conversely, the union will fight for other proposed amendments and will make sure that Prop. 98 stays in the constitution.

Prop. 98 essentially argues that the state must continue to support public schools and community colleges. The opposition is expected, some argue, as the union would not be interested in backing a measure that does not directly reflect on its own ambitions, which is maintaining education in California.

But the proposal to help mental health issues and fight homelessness also promises to provide funding to other social causes, which its authors argue, would make California better as a whole. Regardless of the opposition by the trade union, though, the Californians for Solutions seem to be on track to verify all the signatures they need and push the measure onto the ballots in November.

The Measure to Appear on the Ballot Anyway

The verification process continues though as some 1.1 million valid signatures are required to initiate the ballot measure in the first place. Californians for Solutions has also been long in the making with tribes spearheading it over the past couple of years and looking forward to making it a reality in the upcoming elections. Numerous parties have been attempting to get a foothold in California’s legal race.

In the end, the battle seems to be led by the tribes and card rooms, both of which feel threatened by each other. Meanwhile, voters have admitted that they are fairly confused by the litany of ads that continue to appear on TV and the radio, but offer little insight into each measure – rather, they tend to disparage the other proposal.

Author: Ian Douglas